You Can’t Escape the News

Media and specifically, social media, has changed the landscape on how we as humans get and consume our information and news. If you had any doubt about that, this past election should have made a believer out of you and any other naysayers. As a Using art to help kids understand current events society, we’ve been reduced to driveling idiots who no longer seek out our own information and verify facts before opening our mouths. We take everything we hear, see, and read as gospel and fake news sites were such a huge problem the past few months that the almighty Google, as well as Facebook, announced last week that it would no longer let fake news sites use their sites respective advertising services. They are willing to take money out of their own pockets to help stop the madness that is going on.

When most of us were growing up, the only way that we had access to current events was thru traditional media – news, radio, and newspapers. More often than not our parents did a somewhat decent job of shielding us from traumatic events and coverage of those were limited to the 6 and 11 news and the daily paper. Today, we have nonstop coverage of any and every event and it’s available in every format possible – news stations, websites, blogs, newspapers, NPR – the list is as endless as the coverage. We can’t escape it even if we wanted to and our kids have full access to it as well.

I’m not sure when the shift in news saturation truly began. While discussing it with a friend, my opinion was that it was 9/11 and he felt that it was Desert Storm. I think he’s right in that was the shift in traditional media coverage – by then we had several news-only stations but to me, the difference between Desert Storm and 9/11 was that by the time 9/11 happened, the internet was much more prevalent and more families had access to computers in their homes than not. People’s (over) consumption of the events of 9/11 resulted in epic numbers of PTSD as well as anxiety cases.

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SECCA Presents Dispatches: Live News Through Art

Cora Fisher, SECCA’s curator, obviously felt the same way when she proposed the idea of bringing an exhibit to SECCA. What if we were able to slow down the speed and voracity of how events are delivered to us and in a way that will make us stop and think? Thus, Dispatches was born.

Artistic response to current events is especially important in our digital culture. The rapid speed and high volume of news reporting can make it difficult to separate truth from fiction. The title of the exhibition raises the question of how you can cultivate thoughtfulness in relation to current events that are presented in a speedy and visually complex format.

Dispatches, a new, multi-platform exhibition that brings together contemporary artists, Pulitzer-Prize winning photojournalists, and new media artists. The exhibition features existing works and five new commissions, or ‘dispatches,’ inviting artists to respond to current events happening in our world. The exhibition includes the work of four journalist grantees of the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, which is also partnering with SECCA to extend the exhibit’s reach through public talks, school engagements and live, interactive performances during the exhibit run, Nov. 1, 2016 – Feb. 19, 2017.

Dispatches is divided into five thematic zones: Post-9-11 Realities; Borders and Migrations; Ecological Justice; New Forms of Social Action; and the 2016 US Presidential Election and is a great way to help your kids grasp the world that they’re living in and in a way that’s easier for them to understand. It’s an ideal opportunity to talk to them about events they probably weren’t alive for (such as 9/11) but undoubtedly hear about in school.

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The pieces are thought-provoking and emotional. Showing a piece of life and the world that we, as Americans, can barely wrap our heads around. So many of them make you stop and reflect not just on the events that surrounded them but how they made you feel and perhaps – even changed your mind about how you view things.

You’ll also have a chance to meet these artists in person at free public events SECCA is hosting during the exhibit’s run. Full schedule of events available on their website and Facebook Page.

Because isn’t that what art is really about? Changing your perspective?

Using art to help kids understand current events

Using art to help kids understand current events

Using art to help kids understand current events

Using art to help kids understand current events

Using art to help kids understand current events

Using art to help kids understand current events

Using art to help kids understand current events

Using art to help kids understand current events

Using art to help kids understand current events

Using art to help kids understand current events

Using art to help kids understand current events

Using art to help kids understand current events

Using art to help kids understand current events

Using art to help kids understand current events

About SECCA:

Hours:

  • Monday: Closed
  • Tuesday: 10am – 5pm
  • Wednesday: 10am – 5pm
  • Thursday: 10am – 8pm
  • Friday: 10am – 5pm
  • Saturday: 10am – 5pm
  • Sunday: 1pm – 5pm

*Closed on Major Holidays

Location:

750 Marguerite Drive,
Winston-Salem, NC 27106

Online:

Web: www.secca.org
Facebook: facebook.com/seccacontempart
Twitter: twitter.com/seccacontempart
Instagram: instagram.com/seccacontempart